Threats, intimidation and #femfog

I follow a lot of historians on twitter and earlier in the week I stumbled across the #femfog tag at the International Medieval Congress #IMC2016.  Femfog is a term coined by the retired Mediaeval historian Allen J. Frantzen who apparently had “strong views” about his female colleagues.  In a now deleted personal blog post Frentzen wrote

“Let’s call it the femfog for short, the sour mix of victimization and privilege that makes up modern feminism and that feminists use to intimidate and exploit men … I refer to men who are shrouded in this fog as FUMs, fogged up men. I think they are also fucked up, but let’s settle for the more analytical term.”

If you want to read the whole sorry history of femfog I can highly recommend reading this post by Jo Livingston Snakes and Ladders On Allen Frantzen, misogyny, and the problem with tenure.

The #femfog session covered a wide range of issues relating to women in academia in general and in humanities in particular, including lack of diversity, misogyny, racial and sexual discrimination even “dig culture” and harassment on archaeological excavations*.  I was only able to follow snippets of the conversation as I was in the process of writing this blog post NewDLHE – personal reflections on measuring success, which ironically touched on some of the issues being discussed. You can revisit the #femfog discussions on this storify #FemFog at IMC 2016.

One tweet that did catch my eye though was this one:

I retweeted it and added

It’s true. I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve been told I’m “intimidating”.  I’m genuinely bemused by this.  I mean I’m barely over five feet tall and I’m the kind of person who actively avoids conflict and aggressive behaviour so why do colleagues find me intimidating? Of course I’ve always had my suspicions that the kind of behaviour people find “intimidating” coming from me would be regarded as perfectly normal among older, male colleagues. For example I don’t hesitate to speak up in meetings and if I have something to contribute to the debate I’ll say it (waiting my turn first of course). I also often chair meetings, committees and events which sometimes necessitates stopping some people from monopolising the conversation in order to ensure everyone has an opportunity to speak.  Is that really such “intimidating” behaviour? Or am I missing something?

Anyway, my reblog seems to have struck a chord as several colleagues retweeted it and added their own comments.

Three days later and this thread is still going strong on twitter. Seems like we’re an intimidating bunch…

* I should add, despite working on archaeological excavations for many years, I never personally experienced any harassment though I was well aware it existed and I was certainly familiar with dig culture.

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